Haunted in Death

Version: Unabridged
Author: J.D. Robb
Narrator: Susan Ericksen
Genres: Women Detectives
Publisher: Brilliance Audio
Published In: September 2006
# of Units: 3 CDs
Length: 3 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Number Twelve is an urban legend in 2060 New York City. The hot club in the 1960s, it is now reported to be haunted...and cursed. Lieutenant Eve Dallas is called there to investigate the apparent murder of Radcliff Hopkins, its new owner and the grandson of the man who made Number Twelve a cultural icon. Several bullets from a banned gun end his dream of returning the building to its former glory. With everyone around her talking about the supernatural, pragmatic Eve won't let rumors of ghosts distract her from hard evidence. The case becomes even more bizarre when it appears to be linked to the suspicious disappearance of a rock star eighty-five years ago. As Eve searches for the connection, logic clashes with the unexplainable. She may be forced to face the threat of something more dangerous than a flesh-and-blood killer.

Reviews (12)

Haunted in Death

Written by D. France from Granite Shoals, TX on August 4th, 2009

  • Book Rating: 2/5

The book was a little too short. By the time that I was really getting into it, the book was over. I'm a big fan of the series, and enjoyed a couple of the other novellas, but this one needed more.

Haunted in Death

Written by Jean from Santa Cruz, CA on April 21st, 2008

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Found this book a bit short hated to have it end. This one had flash backs to the 1960s along with rock stars, haunted and cursed house. Enjoy the book set in the future 2060's and wonder how much the book will be correct in what the future holds. Robb is always a good fast pace read. It is great to have the same reader for the entire series.

Hauinted in Death

Written by Nell Molloy on April 5th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Disappointed in this one and is one of my least favorite of J.D.Robb's detective novels. It was too short and just didn't have the suspense which begged for rapt attention to this listener.

Haunted in Death

Written by Angela Jones on March 9th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Not my favorite. It was really short and felt like it was missing a lot of the details.

Haunted in Death

Written by K D on February 26th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I have always enjoyed reading the J.D. Robb books but this is the first audio version I have listened to. The story was interesting, the ending difficult to guess and I enjoyed the little twist at the end that had Eve rethinking her beliefs. The reason I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars was the quality of the reading. Roark loses his strong masculinity and has a horrible Irish accent. Peabody is much too harsh and bossy, and finally, that bad Irish accent creeps in and out as various other characters speak. I found it very distracting in an otherwise enjoyable story.

2 out of 5

Written by Anonymous on February 18th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 2/5

It was hard to keep my attention. Least favorite of J.D. Robb books I've read or listened to.

O.K. book, a bit too short

Written by Anonymous from Houston, TX on November 2nd, 2007

  • Book Rating: 3/5

This is a short book and lacks the substance of others in this series. Not bad, a quick read, but I would skip this novel to get the other "Eve Dallas" novels first.

Haunted in Death

Written by Donna from Troy, MO on October 11th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I love JD ROBB!! Her books characters are like friends. I feel as if I know them and even laugh at their antics in every book. The suspense is great and having the same characters read by the same narrator is great. You feel connected to them thru voice, inflections, etc. I haven't read a bad one yet!! Haunted was no different. Great to the end.

Haunted in Death

Written by Anonymous on September 27th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 5/5

JD Robb can't write a bad book! You simply can't go wrong with Robb...excellent read.

Haunted in Death

Written by Judy Mitchell on September 13th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I liked this book. really didnt have quite enough Peabody and McNab in it though that was one drawback. But it was fine read could of used a little more Direct threat to any of the major characthers.

Author Details

Author Details

Roberts, Nora

"Nora Roberts is truly a publishing phenomenon. With over 127 million copies of her books in print in the U.S. alone, she has come a long way since she wrote her first novel in a spiral notebook using a No. 2 pencil. Now she has published over 140 novels and her work has been optioned and made into films, excerpted in national magazines and translated in over twenty-five different countries. ""I always have stories running around in my head,"" she explains. ""Once I start putting them down on paper, I just keep going; I just keep writing.""

And write she does. In 2000, Nora Roberts reached new heights, both on bestseller lists and in her incomparable talent for creating compelling, passionate page-turners. According to Publishers Weekly, in 2000 she had an amazing 13 bestsellers (12 paperback and 1 hardcover), and of those thirteen several were #1 bestsellers. In addition to her amazing success in mainstream fiction, Nora Roberts remains committed to writing for her category romance audience that took her to into their heart in 1981 with her very first book, a Silhouette romance.

Nora Roberts continues to write futuristic romantic suspense as J.D. Robb, and her characters Eve Dallas and Roarke have become two of her most popular creations ever. Her J.D. Robb titles are hailed as ""a perfect balance of suspense, futuristic police procedure and steamy romance...truly fine entertainment"" by Publishers Weekly.

Reviewers agree that Nora Roberts deserves praise. The Los Angeles Daily News describes her as ""a word artist, painting her story and her characters with vitality and verve."" Kirkus Reviews comments on True Betrayals saying ""Roberts' style has a fresh, contemporary snap."" Roberts is said to be ""reminiscent of Jacqueline Briskin and Sidney Sheldon"" by Booklist, and Rex Reed lauds her saying, ""Move over Sidney Sheldon: the world has a new master of romantic suspense, and her name is Nora Roberts."" Publishers Weekly claims ""Roberts keeps getting better...[her] prolificness shows no sign of abating."" They add, ""When Roberts puts her expert finger on the pulse of romance, legions of fans feel the heartbeat."" USA Today calls Nora ""a consistently entertaining writer.""

The remarkable Ms. Roberts did not become a success overnight. By the time her first novel, Irish Thoroughbred, was published in 1981, she already had three years of hard work behind her and several rejected manuscripts languishing in drawers. Today, according to Entertainment Weekly, ""her stories have fueled the dreams of twenty-five million readers."" One of America's leading novelists, her books are published around the world. She is frequently invited to promote her novels in other countries. Her recent travels took her to England, Italy, Australia and Japan to meet fans, fellow authors and aspiring writers.

CBS has made Sanctuary into a television movie airing on February 28th, 2001 on CBS as ""Nora Roberts' Sanctuary."" The cast includes Melissa Gilbert, Emmy-winner Kathy Baker and Costas Mandylor. CBS has also optioned The Reef for another television movie. Montana Sky has been optioned by TriStar Television for a two-hour television movie. Her book This Magic Moment became the television film ""Magic Moments"" starring Emmy-winner John Shea and Jenny Seagrove. Sacred Sins has been optioned for film by Kaleidoscope, and Private Scandals has been optioned by Burt Reynolds Productions. Reflections and The Law is a Lady were selected by Good Housekeeping magazine for presentation as condensed novels. Honest Illusions and Private Scandals were featured as Readers Digest's Condensed Books.

The Associated Press, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Cosmopolitan, People Magazine and Entertainment Weekly have all featured or mentioned Nora Roberts in articles about writing and the romance genre. She has appeared on ABC-TV's Good Morning America and Cable News Network, and has been featured on the television programs To Tell the Truth, Entertainment Tonight, and Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous. She has been interviewed by local television and radio programs across the country, and she has been featured in dozens of newspapers, including the Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, Toronto Star, The Toronto Sun, Washington Times, Detroit Free Press, Chicago Tribune, and Atlanta Constitution.

Her extraordinary accomplishments have also received recognition from her peers. The first author ever to be inducted into the Romance Writers of America's Hall of Fame, and the first author to receive their Centennial Award when she published her 100th novel Montana Sky, she is the recipient of almost every award given in recognition of excellence in romance writing. In 1997, she was honored at the Romance Writers of America National Conference when she was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award. In addition to her awards from the Romance Writers of America, she has also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Waldenbooks, and she has been honored by B. Dalton Booksellers, the New Jersey Chapter of Romance Writers of America, and BookRak Distributors.

Nora Roberts is a charter member of the Romance Writers of America, and a member of their Washington, D.C. chapter. She was the keynote speaker at their 1994 national conference in New York. She is also a member of Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, The Crime Writers League of America, and Novelists Inc.

The youngest of five children, she was born in Silver Spring, Maryland. She now lives in Keedysville, Maryland.

She also writes under the pen name J.D. Robb"

Robb, J.D.

Creation in Death, published by GP Putnam in November 2007, is the 25th book in the futuristic police procedural series about a Lieutenant Eve Dallas of the New York Police and Security Department. What started in 1995 as a three-book experiment by a then unknown author named J.D. Robb is now a series that keeps readers waiting with bated breath for each installment.


More than a decade ago it wasn’t public knowledge that the genius behind J.D. Robb was best-selling author Nora Roberts, but readers were immediately taken with Eve Dallas’ integrity, strength and heart and her burgeoning relationship with the mysterious Roarke.


The Gothic Journal hailed Robb’s work as “a unique blend of hard-core police drama, science fiction and passionate romance” while The Paperback Forum called it “a fantastic new detective series.”


Since then, 18 of the 25 J.D. Robb titles have landed on the New York Times Bestseller List. And Innocent in Death, the February 2007 release, hit the bestseller list in the number 1 spot.


J.D. Robb was a product of numbers: by 1995, there was a surplus of Nora Roberts’ titles to be released by her publishers and she continued to create more. Reluctant to publish romantic suspense books similar to what she was already writing under a pseudonym, Nora had been playing with the idea of a strong, idealistic woman on the NY police force in the future. J.D. Robb was born. The initials were taken from Ms. Roberts’ sons, Jason and Dan, while Robb was a shortened form of Roberts.


She wrote a three-book arc that had Eve Dallas solving three different murders, but winding its way through all three was the continuing thread of her relationship with the mysterious billionaire Roarke that started in the first book when he was a suspect in a high-profile case.


Looking back from the vantage point of the release of the 25th book in the series, Nora commented, “I think we saw solid potential with the release of the first book. Enough, at least, for everyone to say: Okay, let's do three more.”

She continued, “For me, the emotional investment clicked during the first draft of the first book. I really fell for the characters, and hoped the readers would respond to them so I could keep writing the series.”


A series with a continuing, and growing, cast of characters gave Nora the chance to explore the people she created and peel the layers off book by book. Eve and Roarke were about to get married at the end of that initial three-book arc and are on their honeymoon as the fourth book opens. This afforded Roberts the chance to explore a marriage through the subsequent 19 books to the delight – and despair of some readers.


Those readers have been vocal about their desire to see the couple have a baby or for Eve to become a captain in the department. A baby, explains Nora Roberts would change the way Eve does her job – which is physical and emotional to the point of exhaustion. The answer to that frequently asked question is that a baby would mean the end of the series. As for a captaincy, it’s always possible.


Besides the exploration of the marital state, the cast of characters has grown as Eve, very much a loner in Naked in Death, has opened up her circle to include a partner, her fellow officers and a domineering butler who came along with Roarke. Again, readers have become addicted to seeing what’s going on in the secondary characters’ lives and when there isn’t enough of a particular favorite, they love to ask “Why not?”


“It's the story – it’s always about the story,” explained Nora. “It's gratifying when readers fall for secondary characters and want more. Sometimes there is more--and sometimes there just isn't. If a character has a recurring role, then he or she will pop up--as a cameo or in a more active role--when the story calls for it.”


It wasn’t until the 12th book in the series, Betrayal in Death, that the publisher fully acknowledged that J.D. Robb is indeed Nora Roberts. In the fall of 2003, the two parts of the Nora Roberts whole joined together to write Remember When. The first half was a Roberts’ romantic suspense set in the present, the second half was a Robb In Death that saw Eve picking up a thread that relates to the first part of the book.
Each In Death book now carries the banner: Nora Roberts writing as JD Robb. What started as an experiment is now firmly a part of the Nora Roberts phenomenon.