Rise and Shine

Version: Unabridged
Author: Anna Quindlen
Narrator: Carol Monda
Genres: Fiction
Publisher: Recorded Books
Published In: August 2006
# of Units: 9 CDs
Length: 11 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

It's Monday morning when Meghan Fitzmaurice blows her perfect life to bits. The host of "Rise and Shine," the country's highest rated morning talk show, Meghan cuts to a commercial break, but not before she mutters two forbidden words into her open mike. It's the end of an era, not only for Meghan, a household face who is not equipped to deal with disgrace, but for her younger sister Bridget, a social worker in the Bronx who has lived always in Meghan's long shadow. The effect of Meghan's on-air profanity--and truth telling--is felt by her son, her husband, her friends, her fans and even the city of New York, the capitol of appearance over reality. But above all it transforms the sister with whom she's shared everything, even the mixed blessings of fame. What follows is a story about a city big enough to hold prep school rappers, rich poseurs, familiar strangers, and autograph seekers in the ladies room at black tie balls. But ultimately it's about how, in very different ways, the Fitzmaurice girls whip the place into shape. Meghan and Bridget, Bridget and Meghan. They share smart mouths, a fractured childhood, and a powerful connection that even the worst tragedy can't rupture.

Reviews (5)

Rise and Shine

Written by Anonymous on July 20th, 2011

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Very slow start but overall a good book about the every changing relationship between sisters.

Great Portrait of New York

Written by A. Teal on August 22nd, 2009

  • Book Rating: 4/5

More than just a book about complicated family dynamics this book was a portrait of both New Yorks. The New York of the super-wealthy as seen in Meghan Fitzmaurice and the New York of the poor as seen through Bridget Fitzmaurice. The city and the different cultures of the city came alive in this book. Also the characters were complex and for the most part likable. I enjoyed the voice of the reader. Definitely makes me want to read more from the author.

rise and shine

Written by Anonymous on March 14th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

A good read, sisterly turmoil and love interesting

Rise and Shine

Written by Posey109 on December 15th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I had enjoyed Anna Quindlen's writing, and looked forward to listening to this book. I'm sorry to say that it was full of clichés with a rushed and manipulated ending. The characters were created without much of a back story and most were one-dimensional. I especially had a lot of trouble putting up with the character of Bridget. She tolerated her famous sister's criticism, ego trips, insults until I wanted to scream. I kept waiting for her to assert herself, but her devotion to her sister began to look and sound like a neurosis. Not a bad read if you have a long trip and want something light, but don't look for anything meaningful or insightful.

Rise and Shine

Written by O'Malley from Pearland, TX on February 27th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I really liked this story. The characters are empathetic. I was angry with Meghan and felt sorry for her at the same time. Bridget is a very thoughtful and introspective character. By disk 7 I was kind of worried about where the story was going but the pace picked up quickly.

Author Details

Author Details

Quindlen, Anna

Over the last 30 years, Anna Quindlen's work has appeared in some of America's most influential newspapers, many of its best-known magazines, and on both fiction and non-fiction bestseller lists. She is a novelist and also writes the prestigious "Last Word" column in Newsweek magazine. Her latest novel, Blessings, is a New York Times bestseller and was recently made into a television movie starring Mary Tyler Moore. Quindlen is currently working on a new collection of essays, Loud and Clear, to be published in April 2004.

A columnist at The New York Times from 1981 to 1994, in 1990 Quindlen became only the third woman in the paper’s history to write a regular column for its influential Op-Ed page when she began the nationally syndicated “Public and Private.” A collection of those columns, Thinking Out Loud, was published by Random House in 1993 and was on The New York Times Best Seller List for more than three months. In 1992 Quindlen won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary.

Quindlen joined the Times in 1977 as a general assignment reporter and was named the paper's deputy metropolitan editor in 1983. She wrote the “About New York” column from 1981 to 1983 and created the column, “Life in the 30’s” in 1985.

In 1995 Quindlen left the world of newspapers, which she had joined as a copy girl at age 18, to become a novelist full-time. Quindlen has written four bestselling novels: Object Lessons (1991), One True Thing (1994), Black and Blue (1998) and Blessings (2002). How Reading Changed My Life was released in September 1998 as was One True Thing, a Universal feature film starring Meryl Streep. Black and Blue, which spent six months on The New York Times Best Seller List, was chosen for Oprah’s Book Club, and was made into a television movie. With the release of A Short Guide To A Happy Life in 2000, Quindlen became the first writer ever to have books appear on the fiction, nonfiction, and self-help New York Times Best Seller lists. The book sold close to a million copies.

Quindlen also is the author of a collection of essays, Living Out Loud (1988), and two children's books, The Tree That Came to Stay (1992) and Happily Ever After (1997). She also wrote the text for the coffee table pictorial Naked Babies (1996) and Siblings (1998).

Quindlen holds honorary doctorates from Dartmouth College, Denison University, Moravian College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, Stevens Institute of Technology, Bates College, Southern Connecticut State University and was awarded the University Medal of Excellence by Columbia. She was a Poynter Fellow in Journalism at Yale, and a Victoria Fellow in Contemporary Issues at Rutgers. In 1996 she was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Arts & Sciences. Glamour magazine named her one of its 10 Outstanding Women of the Year in 1991.

Quindlen is a graduate of Barnard College and was elected Chair of Barnard's Board of Trustees in 2003. She also is on the Council of the Author’s Guild, the Board at the Nightingale-Bamford School in New York City and the Board of NARAL Foundation. She is a member of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America Board of Advocates as well.

Anna Quindlen is married to Gerald Krovatin, an attorney, and is the mother of Quindlen, Christopher and Maria Krovatin. She lives with her family in New York City.