Neither Here Nor There

Version: Abridged
Author: Bill Bryson
Narrator: Bill Bryson
Genres: Biography & Memoir
Publisher: Random House (Audio)
Published In: March 1999
# of Units: 5 CDs
Length: 6 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Like many of his generation, Bill Bryson backpacked across Europe in the early seventies -- in search of enlightenment, beer, and women. Twenty years later he decided to retrace the journey he undertook in the halcyon days of his youth. The result is Neither Here Nor There, an affectionate and riotously funny pilgrimage from the frozen wastes of Scandinavia to the chaotic tumult of Istanbul, with stops along the way in Europe's most diverting and historic locales. Like many of his generation, Bill Bryson backpacked across Europe in the early seventies--in search of enlightenment, beer, and women. Twenty years later he decided to retrace the journey he undertook in the halcyon days of his youth. The result is Neither Here Nor There, an affectionate and riotously funny pilgrimage from the frozen wastes of Scandinavia to the chaotic tumult of Istanbul, with stops along the way in Europe's most diverting and historic locales.

Reviews (8)

Neither Hear Nor There

Written by Anonymous on February 12th, 2011

  • Book Rating: 2/5

Maybe I am just getting tired of Bill Bryson, but the vulgar language and add sense of humor has made me want to stop listening to Bill Bryson. Too bad, because I loved his Thunderbolt Kid book.

Neither Here Nor There

Written by Beverly Mausbach on April 10th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

This was entertaining to listen to. Not as great as "A Walk in the Woods" which in my mind is his best, but still up there. I like that he reads his own material --- I could almost "hear" the smile in his voice as he read through certain passages.

not his best, but still very good

Written by KD on March 25th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 3/5

While I enjoyed this book, it was not Bill Bryson's best. It had a few laugh-out-loud moments and the usual odd observations that make his travels so interesting. It's worth a listen, but if someone asked me for a great book, I'd point them to "A Walk in the Woods" first.

Can't Wait to Pack My Bags!

Written by Orville Amazor from Fullerton, CA on September 17th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I agree with all the others: Bill Bryson is simply the best! His adventures are fun to listen to, his observations are witty, and his speaking voice makes you want to accompany him on his journeys just to hear him remark on everything he does. Like in "Walk in the Woods", his tales are best when they include Stephen Katz, who ought to be required to travel with Bryson whenever and wherever he goes! Fun fun fun... now go call your travel agent, inspiration doesn't come any better than this!

oddly sexual

Written by Chris Hedstrom on August 14th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 3/5

This one was better than "Notes from a small Island" but not as funny as "walk in the woods" or "in a sunburned country." Still, I laughed out loud a couple of times and it held my interest, unlike notes. What I found most strange though, is how much more he talked about sex and sexual themes in this book compared to his others. Maybe that has to do with the culture he was traveling in, but mostly it's not refrences to the locations, but odd fantasies, such as travel agents, or nurses in starched uniforms tending to injuries. A little gross. I would recommend Sunburned Country or Walk in the Woods over this one, if you are new to Bryson.

Funny and informative

Written by Anonymous from Laytonsville, MD on July 5th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

As always, Bryson delivers. His humorous account of a hectic trip through Europe is sprinkled with fascinating information and side-splitting personal anecdotes. He is so easy to relate to and such a pleasure to hear. His books shine.

Cheers Bill Bryson!!

Written by Anonymous on July 1st, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I love his humor, and his dry wit. He would be the perfect travel companion, adventuresome enough to try new things and funny enough to keep me laughing. I would go anywhere with him!!

Neither Here Nor There (abr)

Written by Anonymous on January 5th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Wow! I really enjoyed the adventure & feel like I just got back from my travels through Europe!

Author Details

Author Details

Bryson, Bill

Bill Bryson was born in Des Moines, Iowa, the son of William and Mary Bryson. He has an older brother, Michael, and a sister, Mary Elizabeth.

Bryson was educated at Drake University but dropped out in 1972, deciding to backpack around Europe for four months. He returned to Europe the following year with his high-school friend, the pseudonymous Stephen Katz. Some of his experiences from this trip are relived as flashbacks in Neither Here Nor There: Travels in Europe, which documents a similar journey Bryson made twenty years later.

Bryson first visited the United Kingdom in 1973 during a tour of Europe, and decided to stay after landing a job working in a psychiatric hospital - the now defunct Holloway Sanatorium in Virginia Water, Surrey. It was there that he met a nurse named Cynthia, whom he eventually married. The couple returned to the USA in 1975 so Bryson could complete his college degree, after which, in 1977, they settled in England, where they remained until 1995. Living in North Yorkshire and mainly working as a journalist, Bryson eventually became chief sub editor of the business section of The Times, and then deputy national news editor of the business section of The Independent. He left journalism in 1987, three years after the birth of his third child. Still living in Yorkshire, Bryson started writing independently and in 1990 their fourth and final child, Sam, was born.

In 1995, Bryson returned to the United States to live in Hanover, New Hampshire for some years, the stories of which feature in his book I'm A Stranger Here Myself, alternatively titled Notes from a Big Country in the United Kingdom and Canada. In 2003, however, the Brysons and their four children returned to England, and now live near Wymondham, Norfolk.

Also in 2003, in conjunction with World Book Day, voters in the United Kingdom chose Bryson's book Notes from a Small Island as that which best sums up British identity and the state of the nation.[1] In the same year, he was appointed a Commissioner for English Heritage.

In 2004, Bryson won the prestigious Aventis Prize for best general science book with A Short History of Nearly Everything.[2] This 500-page popular literature piece explores not only the histories and current statuses of the sciences, but also reveals their humble and often humorous beginnings. Although one "top scientist" is alleged to have jokingly described the book as "annoyingly free of mistakes",[3] Bryson himself makes no such claim, and a list of seven reported errors in the book is available online, identifying the chapter in which each appears but with no page or line references. In 2005, the book won the EU Descartes Prize for science communication.[2]

Bryson has also written two popular works on the history of the English language — Mother Tongue and Made in America — and, more recently, an update of his guide to usage, Bryson's Dictionary of Troublesome Words (published in its first edition as The Penguin Dictionary of Troublesome Words in 1983). These books were popularly acclaimed and well-reviewed, though they received criticism from academics in the field, who claimed they contained factual errors, urban myths, and folk etymologies. Though Bryson has no formal linguistics qualifications, he is generally a well-regarded writer on the subject of languages.

In 2005, Bryson was appointed Chancellor of Durham University,[3] succeeding the late Sir Peter Ustinov, and has been particularly active with student activities, even appearing in a Durham student film: the sequel to The Assassinator and promoting litter picks in the city[4]. He had praised Durham as "a perfect little city" in Notes from a Small Island. He has also been awarded honorary degrees by numerous universities.

In 2006, Bryson ran (as part of a celebrity relay team) in the Tresco marathon, the Scillian equivalent of the London marathon. The same year, Frank Cownie, the mayor of Des Moines, awarded Bryson the key to the city and announced that October 21, 2006 would be known as, Bill Bryson - "The Thunderbolt Kid" day.[5]

In November 2006, Bryson interviewed Prime Minister Tony Blair on the state of science and education.[6]

On December 13, 2006, Bryson was awarded an honorary OBE for his contribution to literature.[7] The following year, he was awarded the James Joyce Award of the Literary and Historical Society of University College Dublin.

In January 2007, Bryson was the Schwartz Visiting Fellow of the Pomfret School in Connecticut.[8]

In May 2007, he became the President of the Campaign to Protect Rural England.[9][10] His first area focus in this role was the establishment of an anti-littering campaign across England. He discussed the future of the countryside with Richard Mabey, Sue Clifford, Nicholas Crane and Richard Girling at CPRE's Volunteer Conference in November 2007.