A Moveable Feast

Version: Unabridged
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Narrator: James Naughton
Genres: Biography & Memoir
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
Published In: June 2006
# of Units: 5 CDs
Length: 5 hours
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Overview

Ernest Hemingway’s classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, now available in a restored edition, includes the original manuscript along with insightful recollections and unfinished sketches.

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway’s most enduring works. Since Hemingway’s personal papers were released in 1979, scholars have examined the changes made to the text before publication. Now, this special restored edition presents the original manuscript as the author prepared it to be published.

Featuring a personal Foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernest’s sole surviving son, and an Introduction by grandson of the author, Seán Hemingway, editor of this edition, the book also includes a number of unfinished, never-before-published Paris sketches revealing experiences that Hemingway had with his son, Jack, and his first wife Hadley. Also included are irreverent portraits of literary luminaries, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford, and insightful recollections of Hemingway’s own early experiments with his craft.

Widely celebrated and debated by critics and readers everywhere, the restored edition of A Moveable Feast brilliantly evokes the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the unbridled creativity and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

Reviews (2)

A wonderful book

Written by Anne on February 18th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I loved, loved, loved this book! I hadn't read Hemingway since high school and, frankly, didn't like him that much. What a wonderful portrait he paints of being young in Paris in the 1920's. And the people he knows are all people you're familiar with (and he pulls no punches about what he thinks of them). To me what is most moving is his portrait of his first wife, Hadley. He clearly regrets how he treated her and this beautiful book is his apology to her. I think the narrator does a great job. It's a great read!

Fascinating and historically significant

Written by Meredith from Sacramento, CA on February 8th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 5/5

This was my first real foray into Hemingway's work, and I loved it. It's a fascinating look not only into a period of Hemingway's private life, but also into the personalities who were at the forefront of the famed "Lost Generation" of modern literature. As Hemingway gets to know writers like Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound and Scott Fitzgerald, he talks about them so intimately that you really feel as though you're getting to know them, too. You also get quite an intimate portrait of the young Hemingway as seen by the older Hemingway, for whom the innocence he still had at that time seems to be a bittersweet memory. Although I find James Naughton's narration kind of flat, it actually works pretty well for an author like Hemingway, whose language is so plain and straightforward. A great audiobook!

Author Details

Author Details

Hemingway, Ernest

Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), born in Oak Park, Illinois, started his career as a writer in a newspaper office in Kansas City at the age of seventeen. After the United States entered the First World War, he joined a volunteer ambulance unit in the Italian army. Serving at the front, he was wounded, was decorated by the Italian Government, and spent considerable time in hospitals. After his return to the United States, he became a reporter for Canadian and American newspapers and was soon sent back to Europe to cover such events as the Greek Revolution.

During the twenties, Hemingway became a member of the group of expatriate Americans in Paris, which he described in his first important work, The Sun Also Rises (1926). Equally successful was A Farewell to Arms (1929), the study of an American ambulance officer's disillusionment in the war and his role as a deserter. Hemingway used his experiences as a reporter during the civil war in Spain as the background for his most ambitious novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940). Among his later works, the most outstanding is the short novel, The Old Man and the Sea (1952), the story of an old fisherman's journey, his long and lonely struggle with a fish and the sea, and his victory in defeat.

Hemingway - himself a great sportsman - liked to portray soldiers, hunters, bullfighters - tough, at times primitive people whose courage and honesty are set against the brutal ways of modern society, and who in this confrontation lose hope and faith. His straightforward prose, his spare dialogue, and his predilection for understatement are particularly effective in his short stories, some of which are collected in Men Without Women (1927) and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories (1938). Hemingway died in Idaho in 1961.