Bad Luck and Trouble

Version: Unabridged
Author: Lee Child
Narrator: Dick Hill
Genres: Thriller, Detective Stories
Publisher: Random House Audio Assets
Published In: May 2007
# of Units: 10 CDs
Length: 13 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

A decade postmilitary, Jack Reacher has an ATM card and the clothes on his back - no phone, no ties, and no address. But now a woman from his old unit has done the impossible. From Chicago, Frances Neagley finds Reacher using a signal only the eight members of their elite team of army investigators would know. She tells him a terrifying story about the brutal death of a man they both served with. Soon Reacher is reuniting with the survivors of his old team, scrambling to raise the living, bury the dead, and connect the dots in a mystery that is growing darker by the day.

In a world of bad luck and trouble, when someone targets Jack Reacher and his team, they'd better be ready for what comes right back at them.

Reviews (18)

Lee Child

Written by doda from Staten Island, NY on February 21st, 2012

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Loved it - really like the way he writes and the reader is exactly as I picture Jack Reacher, the lead character. Story was great with a great ending. Doda

Bad Luck and Trouble

Written by Anonymous from Roseville, MI on January 12th, 2011

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I'm amazed that someone said Dick Hill is irritating as a narrator. He's one of the Best. I can't imagine anyone else narrating the Reacher series.

Bad Luck and Trouble

Written by Anne on August 6th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I disagree with Carrie E. In my opinion Dick Hill performance is just fine. Additionally "annoying narrator" doesn't seem to be a helpful criticism - too general. I look forward to reading more Jack Reacher novels.

annoying narrator

Written by Carrie E. on May 25th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I agree that the character of "Reacher" is compelling, but WOW this narrator is annoying and almost ruins this audio book. I don't think I'll listen to another Lee Child if he is the reader.

Bad Luck and Trouble

Written by Jacque on November 28th, 2009

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Jack Reacher is THE Hero!! Bad Luck and Trouble is the best so far.

Jack Reacher is my hero

Written by Angie Teal on February 24th, 2009

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Jack Reacher is one of my favorites. I love thrillers and suspense and detective stories, especially when military is involved. Jack Reacher is a great cop, because he is not always playing nice. The story was really good, fast pace and full of suspense. I want to listen to all his books. The reader wasn't that great, really good with male voice-overs, but terrible with female cast.

Bad Luck & Trouble

Written by Sue on December 24th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

A bit drawn out with all the numbers game going on but over all interesting... A lot dead people so be prepared for that... just a might rough. But did keep my interest all the way through. I'll read more of his.

Bad Luck and Trouble

Written by Anonymous on December 17th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I love any thing Lee Child writes. Jack Reacher is my favorite character and this one did not disappoint at all. Great story, love the ending and love Jack Reacher. Couldn't wait to get in my car and go somewhere so I could listen.

Bad Luck and Mumbles

Written by Anonymous from Alpharetta, GA on November 24th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 1/5

The narrator is so bad that I couldn't get through the first cd. Don't bother...

Bad Luck & Trouble

Written by Bruce Curson from Slidell, LA on November 21st, 2008

  • Book Rating: 3/5

The narration was simply terrrible. I would have given a rating of two but notched it up since the story did have some entertainment value even though it was a bit far fetched. Overall, not recommended.

Author Details

Author Details

Child, Lee

Lee Child was born in the exact geographic center of England, in the heart of the industrial badlands. Never saw a tree until he was twelve. It was the sort of place where if you fell in the river, you had to go to the hospital for a mandatory stomach pump. The sort of place where minor disputes were settled with box cutters and bicycle chains. He's got the scars to prove it.

But he survived, got an education, and went to law school, but only because he didn't want to be a lawyer. Without the pressure of aiming for a job in the field, he figured it would be a relaxing subject to study. He spent most of the time in the university theater - to the extent that he had to repeat several courses, because he failed the exams - and then went to work for Granada Television in Manchester, England. Back then, Granada was a world-famous production company, known for shows like Brideshead Revisited, Jewel in the Crown, Prime Suspect and Cracker. Lee worked on the broadcast side of the company, so his involvement with the good stuff was limited. But he remembers waiting in the canteen line with people like Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud, Natalie Wood and Michael Apted. And he says that being involved with more than 40,000 hours of the company's program output over an eighteen-year stay taught him a thing or two about telling a story. He also wrote thousands of links, trailers, commercials and news stories, most of them on deadlines that ranged from fifteen minutes to fifteen seconds. So the thought of a novel-a-year didn't worry him too much, in his next career.

But why a next career? He was fired, back in 1995, that's why. It was the usual Nineties downsizing thing. After eighteen years, he was an expensive veteran, and he was also the union organizer, and neither thing fit the company's plan for the future. And because of the union involvement, he wasn't on too many alternative employers' wish lists, either. So he became a writer, because he couldn't think of anything else to do. He had an idea for a character who had suffered the same downsizing experience but who was taking it completely in his stride. And he figured if he brought the same total commitment to his audience that he'd seen his television peers develop, he could get something going. He named the character Jack Reacher and wrote Killing Floor as fast as he could. He needed to sell it before his severance check ran out. He made it with seven weeks to spare, and luckily the book was an instant hit, selling strongly all around the world, and winning both the Anthony Award and the Barry Award for Best First Novel. It led to contracts for at least nine more Reacher books.

Lee moved from the UK to the US in the summer of 1998. He lives in New York and France with his American wife, Jane. They have a grown-up daughter, Ruth. Lee likes to travel, for vacations, but especially on promotion tours so he can meet his readers, to whom he is eternally grateful. His latest thriller, Nothing to Lose was published in 2008.