Next

Version: Unabridged
Author: Michael Crichton
Narrator: Dylan Baker
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Thriller
Publisher: HarperAudio
Published In: November 2006
# of Units: 11 CDs
Length: 12 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Is a loved one missing some body parts? Are blondes becoming extinct? Is everyone at your dinner table of the same species? Humans and chimpanzees differ in only 400 genes; is that why an adult human being resembles a chimp fetus? And should that worry us? There's a new genetic cure for drug addiction— is it worse than the disease?

We live in a time of momentous scientific leaps; a time when it's possible to sell our eggs and sperm online for thousands of dollars or test our spouses for genetic maladies. We live in a time when one fifth of all our genes are owned by someone else, and an unsuspecting person and his family can be pursued cross-country because they happen to have certain valuable genes within their chromosomes . . .

Devilishly clever, "Next" blends fact and fiction into a breathless tale of a new world where nothing is what it seems, and a set of new possibilities can open at every turn. "Next" challenges our sense of reality and notions of morality. Balancing the comic and bizarre with the genuinely frightening and disturbing, "Next" shatters our assumptions, and reveals shocking new choices where we least expect.

The future is closer than you think. Get used to it.

Reviews (21)

Next

Written by Anonymous on March 31st, 2010

  • Book Rating: 1/5

Confusing, disjointed. Jumped from situation to situation so much hard to follow and keep all characters straight. Possibly one of the worst books I have rented.

Brilliant

Written by Donn Edwards on February 13th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I'm glad I bought the unabridged version. Michael Crichton manages to fit a lot of information into the story, without sounding "preachy" like Dan Brown does. He also keeps the pace going and provides some humorous and touching moments.

Next

Written by Jon from Battle Ground, WA on August 19th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Good book. Makes you think about what is really going on behind closed doors.

Interesting ideas but...

Written by Anonymous on July 25th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

...not a great novel. I am a fan of Michael Crichton's work and really enjoyed "Prey" but did not find "Next" to be the best book he's written. The concepts were really interesting: genetic manipulation and all its possible flaws; however as a story it never gelled.

Next

Written by Kathy B on April 24th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Next kept me wondering if I should ditch this book and move on to the next! I love Michael Crichton's books and was disappointed in the format and the pace of this book. Although I am involved in the biologic and genetic industry, I found this boring. Perhaps it had something to do with the way he jumps around in the telling of it.

Next

Written by Anonymous on April 14th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Another Michael Crichton book full of an overflow of techinical information that clouds the story, and makes the base storyline hard to follow. I have read books before where there were several seemingly unlinked storylines going at once that eventually came together to make sense of them all, but this one really missed the mark. I almost couldn't finish the book. All I kept thinking through the entire 11 CD experience was, "How does this all connect?" and only at the very very end do any of the characters come together. I think he means to make a good point about messing with nature, there are some real concerns regarding cloning and the laws regarding genes. But he makes it way to obscure and borderline boring.

Next

Written by Jeanne Peterson on April 9th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I love Michael Crichton, but this book doesn't cut it! I had a difficult time getting through it. Jumped around way too much. A good message, but poorly written. Crichton didn't have his heart in this one!

NEXT

Written by Jeanne Peterson on March 10th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I LOVE MICHAEL CRICHTON'S BOOKS! THIS DIDN'T CUT IT THOUGH. I FOUND IT DIFFICULT TO FOLLOW AND I DIDN'T PARTICULARLY CARE FOR THE CHARACTERS. IT JUST NEVER CAME TOGETHER FOR ME.

Not a instant classic

Written by Christopher Tafelski on March 3rd, 2008

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I am a huge fan of Michael Crichton, but this one was no where near his usual abilities. The story was choppy at points and it was as if he tried to write five short stories and crammed them all in one book about the same theme. Some of the plot points were brushed away to a resolution and the rest were ho-hum resolutions. I am a big fan of Jurassic park series and i looked forward to this book, but was left with an OK story. Overall, not a bad listen, but you must like Michael to really enjoy this book.

Next

Written by Anonymous on January 9th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 1/5

I've always enjoyed Crichton's books, however this turned out to be the exception. It did have some interesting moments but overall it was slow, sometimes confusing but most of all it didn't have a story to it. I kept waiting for the wrap up which never came. The ending was very disappointing; all I can say is that it just ended.

Author Details

Author Details

Crichton, Michael

Michael Crichton is a writer and filmmaker, best known as the author of Jurassic Park and the creator of ER. His most recent novel, Next, about genetics and law, was published in December 2006.

Crichton graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College, received his MD from Harvard Medical School, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, researching public policy with Jacob Bronowski. He has taught courses in anthropology at Cambridge University and writing at MIT. Crichton's 2004 bestseller, State of Fear, acknowledged the world was growing warmer, but challenged extreme anthropogenic warming scenarios. He predicted future warming at 0.8 degrees C. (His conclusions have been widely misstated.)

Crichton's interest in computer modeling goes back forty years. His multiple-discriminant analysis of Egyptian crania, carried out on an IBM 7090 computer at Harvard, was published in the Papers of the Peabody Museum in 1966. His technical publications include a study of host factors in pituitary chromophobe adenoma, in Metabolism, and an essay on medical obfuscation in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Crichton's first bestseller, The Andromeda Strain, was published while he was still a medical student. He later worked full time on film and writing. Now one of the most popular writers in the world, his books have been translated into thirty-six languages, and thirteen have been made into films.

He's had a lifelong interest in computers. His feature film Westworld was the first to employ computer-generated special effects back in 1973. Crichton's pioneering use of computer programs for film production earned him a Technical Achievement Academy Award in 1995.

Crichton has won an Emmy, a Peabody, and a Writer's Guild of America Award for ER. In 2002, a newly discovered ankylosaur was named for him: Crichtonsaurus bohlini. He has a daughter, Taylor, and lives in Los Angeles. Crichton remarried in 2005.