Tarzan the Untamed

Version: Unabridged
Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs
Narrator: Patrick Lawlor
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Action & Adventure, Classics
Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks
Published In: March 2006
# of Units: 9 CDs
Length: 11 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

"The Tarzan legend returns us to that Eden where, free of clothes and the inhibitions of a repressive society, a man is able, as William Faulkner put it, to prevail as well as endure."—Gore Vidal

Here is the continuing adventure of one of fiction's most dramatic heroes, Tarzan the ape-man. In this new episode, Tarzan has given up his jungle ways and is living contentedly on a farm with his beloved wife Jane, as a wealthy member of British nobility. But when he returns one day from a trip to Nairobi, he finds his farm has been laid to waste by German troops, with no one left alive. In grief and rage, he casts off the veneer of civilization to become once again the primitive ape-man, ranging the country in search of those who killers his mate to mete out to them the vengeance of the jungle.

Never has master storyteller Edgar Rice Burroughs so skillfully shown the struggles within the breast of his ape-man hero, who through dozens of adventures and hair-breadth escapes, tracks down his enemies and triumphs in a crashing, action-packed climax.

Reviews (1)

Tarzan the Untamed

Written by BKB from Adelanto, CA on December 15th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 2/5

Don't get me wrong, I am a big fan of ERB. This book though, tested my resolve. It seems to me that the story was meant originally in serial form and so it comes and goes in spurts. We are led through a series of coincidences so far fetched that makes the John Carter books seem non-fictional. Some of the olde English colonial language is a bit putting off also. However, if you ever wanted to know ERB's opinion regarding imperialistic Germany, this is your book.

Author Details

Author Details

Burroughs, Edgar Rice

"Burroughs was born on September 1, 1875 in Chicago, Illinois, the son of a businessman. He was educated at a number of local schools, and during the Chicago influenza epidemic in 1891 spent a half year on his brothers' ranch on the Raft River in Idaho. He then attended the Phillips Academy in Andover and then the Michigan Military Academy. Graduating in 1895, and failing the entrance exam for West Point, he ended up as an enlisted soldier with the Seventh Cavalry in Arizona. After being diagnosed with a heart problem and thus found ineligible for promotion to officer class, he was discharged in 1897.

What followed was a string of seemingly unrelated and short stint jobs. Following a period of drifting and ranch work in Idaho, Burroughs found work at his father's firm in 1899. He married Emma Centennia Hulbert in 1900. In 1904 he left his job and found less regular work, initially in Idaho but soon back in Chicago.

By 1911, after seven years of low wages, he was working as a pencil sharpener wholesaler and began to write fiction. By this time Burroughs and Emma had two children, Joan and Hulbert. During this period, he had copious spare time and he began reading many pulp fiction magazines and claimed:

""...if people were paid for writing rot such as I read in some of those magazines that I could write stories just as rotten. As a matter of fact, although I had never written a story, I knew absolutely that I could write stories just as entertaining and probably a whole lot more so than any I chanced to read in those magazines.""

Aiming his work at the 'pulp' magazines then in circulation, his first story ""Under the Moons of Mars"" was serialized in All-Story magazine in 1912 and earned Burroughs US$400.

Burroughs soon took up writing full-time and by the time the run of ""Under the Moons of Mars"" had finished he had completed two novels, including Tarzan of the Apes which was published from October 1912 and went on to become his most successful brand. In 1913, Burroughs and Emma welcomed their third and last child, John Coleman.

Burroughs also wrote popular science fiction/fantasy stories involving Earthly adventurers transported to various planets (notably Barsoom, Burroughs' fictional name for Mars), lost islands, and into the interior of the hollow earth in his Pellucidar stories, as well as westerns and historical romances. Along with All-Story, many of his stories were published in the Argosy Magazine.

Tarzan was a cultural sensation when introduced. Burroughs was determined to capitalize on Tarzan's popularity in every way possible. He planned to exploit Tarzan through several different media including a syndicated Tarzan comic strip, movies and merchandise. Experts in the field advised against this course of action, stating that the different media would just end up competing against each other. Burroughs went ahead, however, and proved the experts wrong?the public wanted Tarzan in whatever fashion he was offered. Tarzan remains one of the most successful fictional characters to this day and is a cultural icon.

In 1923 Burroughs set up his own company, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., and began printing his own books through the 1930s. He divorced Emma in 1934 and married Florence Dearholt in 1935. They divorced in 1942. At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor he was a resident of Hawaii and, despite being a sexagenarian, he spent the conflict as a war correspondent. He died in Encino, California on March 19, 1950 having written almost seventy novels.

The town of Tarzana, California was named after Tarzan. In 1919 Burroughs purchased a large ranch north of Los Angeles, California which he named ""Tarzana"". The citizens of the community that sprang up around the ranch voted to adopt that name when their town was incorporated in 1928.

The Burroughs crater on Mars is named in Burroughs' honor."