The Art of War: The Denma Translation

Version: Unabridged
Author: Sun Tzu , Denma Translation Group , Sunzi
Narrator: Carl Williams
Genres: Philosophy, Science & Technology
Publisher: Sounds True
Published In: February 2003
# of Units: 3 CDs
Length: 3 hours, 30 minutes
Ratings:
Tell Your Friends:

Overview

At the core of this ancient strategy manual is the understanding that conflict is an inescapable part of human life. Since, as Sun Tzu teaches, aggression and response in kind can lead only to destruction, we must learn to work with conflict in a more profound and effective way. Crucial to this strategic vision is knowledge – especially self-knowledge – and a view of the whole that seeks to bring conflicting views into a larger perspective. This new and unusually faithful translation carefully preserves the enigmatic quality of the original – allowing us to discover innumerable insights in its lines millennia after this oral tradition was first set down. Line-by-line commentary reveals the broader implications of Sun Tzu's teachings and how they can be applied to everyday circumstances. An abridged audio recording of the book The Art of War (Shambhala Publishing, 2002). Shambhala Lion Editions.

Reviews (18)

Opium for the Masses

Written by Daniel Taibi on February 20th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 1/5

I know this is one of the "great" works and therefore shouldn't poo poo it. But, I couldn't get through it. The phrases/wisdom were so anachronistic that I would need to spend significant time to translate them into modern terms. Do not listen while driving!!

Not the worst book...

Written by William Henninger IV on February 7th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 1/5

Not the most engaging book. Great book to say you read...if you want to impress people.

The Art of Bore

Written by Adam from New York, NY on October 26th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 1/5

Boring, Boring , Boring, Boring , Very Boring. If I had a sword handy I would have plunged it into my heart .

the Art of War

Written by Talmadge V Vessels Jr from Petaluma, CA on September 11th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Educational. An instructive manual every executive should own and learn. Husbands and wives, lawyers and judges; anyone and every one who has ever bickered, argued or fought can benefit from a little strategy and a lot more compassion. Wouldn't you really rather take it all than have half of everything destroyed during the "negotiations"? T. V. Vessels, Jr. - author.

Much different than I thought.

Written by Marc on May 8th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I did not know the book was basically impossible to understand when translated to English. With that in mind, it really only makes sense to listen to CDs 2 and 3 where they summarize each section after reading it. All in all, it is very interesting to listen to the strategies of a 1500 year old book and try to apply them to today's warfare on the battlefield and in the office environment.

The Art of War

Written by Christa Krais on April 24th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 2/5

At the beginning, I thought I felt the vibe of this book. My mind was working hard trying to piece it into modern application. Ultimately, though, I just found it monotonous and inapplicable to most everything I encounter in life, even at life's most corporate cut-throat level. Perhaps I'm not academic enough to fully appreciate The Art of War -- or perhaps many academics are just too embarrassed to say they don't get it either. Regardless, it's boring.

The Art of War

Written by Michael Herb on June 23rd, 2006

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I realize this is considered a classic but the writing does not translate well into this time period. I think the group that translated it did a good job and I appreciated their commentary, but the text of the book by today's standards is not very good. It's redundant and confusing and whatever nuggets of wisdom one is able to mine from the text come at a heavy price. In short you listen to a lot nonsense before you get to anything that really strikes you as interesting. The narrators explain that part of the reason for this comes from the fact that the book manifests thoughts and ideas that come from an oral tradition because it had been composed around the 5th century. Since most people could not read then ideas had to be passed on in such a way. I can appreciate that but nonetheless it did not make for a very entertaining book. I would not listen to it again nor would I recommend it to others.

Art of War

Written by Mark Rose from San Jose, CA on March 23rd, 2006

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I have heard so much about this book; it was simlpy not that great. If you think this is applicable to modern life you're a **very** abstract thinker. If you think that abstractly, you probably don't need this book.

Art of War

Written by Carmen from Atlanta, GA on February 10th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 4/5

This is one of those books that I think most people should read at least once in their lives. The teachings are timeless. I took it in and understood the points. The first CD was great. The last two are the drawn out explanations in "modern terms," which I didn't feel I needed to hear.

Art of War

Written by M W Ricardo from Anaheim Hills, CA on February 9th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 2/5

Usually I listen to the cd's while I drive. I do this to learn a little something and to stay alert while I drive. I have read the book and it was educational and entertaining, the cd had the same information but was so drawn out it was more of a sedative than a interest.

Author Details

Author Details

Tzu, Sun

Thomas Cleary earned his Ph.D. in East Asian studies at Harvard University and is renowned for his translations of classic Chinese, Japanese, Sanskrit, Pali and Arabic religious texts. His translations include the bestselling 'The Art of War', 'The Essential Tao', 'The Essential Confucius', 'The Essential Koran', and 'The Secret of the Golden Flower'. He lives in Cambridge, MA.

, Denma Translation Group

The Denma Translation Group is led by Kidder Smith and James Gimian.