The Snows of Kilimanjaro

Version: Unabridged
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Narrator: Charlton Heston
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Literature, Classics
Publisher: Caedmon
Published In: January 2008
Length: 1 hour
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Overview

It came with a rush; not as a rush of water nor of wind; but of a sudden evil-smelling emptiness. . ."

A flamboyant, hard-drinking, ruthless, and womanizing world adventurer comes face-to-face with the one antagonist he cannot conquer: his own ignoble and imminent death. . . .

Written in 1938, "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" is a classic distillation of the themes Ernest Hemingway obsessively explored throughout his writing career. When Harry, the central character, goes on safari to "work the fat off his mind," his ambitions are cut short when a terrible accident leaves him facing his ultimate death and weighing the meaning of his life. Hemingway's brilliant prose is given a penetrating and moving reading by Charlton Heston in an audio that only deepens in meaning with each listening.

Author Details

Author Details

Hemingway, Ernest

Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), born in Oak Park, Illinois, started his career as a writer in a newspaper office in Kansas City at the age of seventeen. After the United States entered the First World War, he joined a volunteer ambulance unit in the Italian army. Serving at the front, he was wounded, was decorated by the Italian Government, and spent considerable time in hospitals. After his return to the United States, he became a reporter for Canadian and American newspapers and was soon sent back to Europe to cover such events as the Greek Revolution.

During the twenties, Hemingway became a member of the group of expatriate Americans in Paris, which he described in his first important work, The Sun Also Rises (1926). Equally successful was A Farewell to Arms (1929), the study of an American ambulance officer's disillusionment in the war and his role as a deserter. Hemingway used his experiences as a reporter during the civil war in Spain as the background for his most ambitious novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940). Among his later works, the most outstanding is the short novel, The Old Man and the Sea (1952), the story of an old fisherman's journey, his long and lonely struggle with a fish and the sea, and his victory in defeat.

Hemingway - himself a great sportsman - liked to portray soldiers, hunters, bullfighters - tough, at times primitive people whose courage and honesty are set against the brutal ways of modern society, and who in this confrontation lose hope and faith. His straightforward prose, his spare dialogue, and his predilection for understatement are particularly effective in his short stories, some of which are collected in Men Without Women (1927) and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories (1938). Hemingway died in Idaho in 1961.