The Sun Also Rises

Version: Unabridged
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Narrator: William Hurt
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Classics
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
Published In: October 2006
# of Units: 7 CDs
Length: 8 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Hemingway's first great novel, it is the story of aimless expatriates, the "lost generation", adrift in France and Spain.

Reviews (11)

Boring

Written by Anonymous on March 26th, 2013

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I had to read "A Farewell to Arms" in high school and did not like it one bit, I used Cliff notes for the whole thing. After listening to "The Paris Wife" (a GREAT BOOK!) I thought I better give Papa another chance. I still didn't like him, and the reader has such a monotone, I couldn't finish it. I guess Hemingway is not for me, except for "The Old Man and the Sea", that one is wonderful.

Still fresh after all these years

Written by Anne on July 27th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I enjoyed this book -- clearly some of it is a little dated (shocking anti-Semitism). That said, it's still surprisingly fresh in terms of expressing human emotion and reactions to situations.

Overrated

Written by nittany1979 on July 11th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Not sure why this book is accompanied by such fanfare? A group of yuppies drifting through Europe getting sloshed at random bars? A few drunken fist fights and a few sobering bull fights. Did I miss anything? Hemingway once again avoids any thesaurus based diction, instead focusing on the DICK & JANE prose that are synonymous with his name. An OK book, but not sure why so celebrated?

The Setting Sun

Written by Anonymous on December 20th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises is considered one of America's greatest works. Unfortunately, the characters are disheartened, disenchanted, disconnected, and extremely dislikeable. They're ostensibly searching for their raisons d'etre, but don't seem to care that they're not finding anything. Yes, I understand that Hemingway was lashing out at Stein for calling him and his contemporaries the "lost generation," but these characters don't even care that they're lost. They're just killing time until time kills them. William Hurt did a great job narrating the book, and despite my preceding rant, The Sun Also Rises is worth reading. Just be sure to take some Paxil first.

The Sun Also Rises

Written by Robert Boller from Sonoma, CA on September 18th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 5/5

It’s fair to say that this novel isn’t for everyone; it’s probably not even for everyone who enjoys classics. It’s certainly not for anyone who requires overstated plot lines with heaps of action to remain attentive. However, it is a must read for those who enjoy really placing themselves in a scene. One of the hardest things about Hemmingway for many readers is his detail. It’s best appreciated if one can really see the setting, place oneself in it and appreciate the often difficult emotions the characters are experiencing. The understated dialogue, although present throughout the work, requires the reader to reflect on the character’s emotion and determine what is the motivation and meaning of the spoken word. This style is reflective of “polite conversation” of the times. William Hurt is tasked to play many characters. He fills in the missing blanks from the page about whom they are and how they feel. Through the use of tone, inflection and pace Hurt more than rises to the occasion

I Thought I knew Hemingway

Written by David D on July 13th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 5/5

It is a bit suprising that while I had read some Hemingway as a young student, this very "modern" novel had been missed. The "Lost Generation" of Paris and Pamplona, Jake Barnes and his stifling impotence, Lady Brett Ashley and her succession of men, anti-semitism, bull fighting , alcoholic debauchery all were here in Hemingway's breakthrough novel. A must read (or listen) for every serious reader. William Hurt does a great job with the numerous accents, American, English, Spanish, Scottish and in men and women's vocal inflections. At the same time he succeeds in protraying the aimlessness, depression and weary pleasure-seeking of the "Lost Generation" after the "Great Wars" massive destruction and killing.

The Sun Also Rises

Written by Gary Kuhlken from Stockton, CA on April 21st, 2007

  • Book Rating: 1/5

As I reread the comments about this book, I was reminded that it really does take all kinds. I had great expectations of this book. As I finished each CD, I figgered the book would soon get interesting, but I was disappointed each time. The whole book seemed to have been written just to show off the reader's ability to handle accents. I'm gonna stick to non-classics...gary

The Sun Also Rises

Written by Anonymous on March 26th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 1/5

This was book was really painful to get thru. We read this book for book group, and only 2 out of the 10 could complete it. The plot was thin, and Hemmingway gave detail on such drivel, such how they paid the bill at the bar. The ending was welcome, but very anticlimatic. I pushed on to see where the book would end up, and it just...ended. I believe Hemmingway's writing is a case of the Emperor's New Clothes. His writing may have been innovative when it was published in the twenties and thirties. Now that people have labeled him as great, everybody is afraid to say otherwise. William Hurt should not be reading for books on tape. His voice was monotone, but had inflections in the strangest places. I welcomed his comical accents to avoid his normal voice.

The Sun Also Rises

Written by Krista Hahn on January 28th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I really enjoyed this title. The narrator was a little monotone but overall did a great job.

The Sun Also Rises

Written by Anonymous from Grandville, MI on December 14th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 5/5

This is an amazing reading of a glorious novel!!! William Hurt reads it and he has all the accents down pat. It is very entertaining; it's almost as entertaining as if you are reading it yourself. I would recommend this if you're the slightest bit interested in Hemingway. It will keep you captivated.

Author Details

Author Details

Hemingway, Ernest

Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), born in Oak Park, Illinois, started his career as a writer in a newspaper office in Kansas City at the age of seventeen. After the United States entered the First World War, he joined a volunteer ambulance unit in the Italian army. Serving at the front, he was wounded, was decorated by the Italian Government, and spent considerable time in hospitals. After his return to the United States, he became a reporter for Canadian and American newspapers and was soon sent back to Europe to cover such events as the Greek Revolution.

During the twenties, Hemingway became a member of the group of expatriate Americans in Paris, which he described in his first important work, The Sun Also Rises (1926). Equally successful was A Farewell to Arms (1929), the study of an American ambulance officer's disillusionment in the war and his role as a deserter. Hemingway used his experiences as a reporter during the civil war in Spain as the background for his most ambitious novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940). Among his later works, the most outstanding is the short novel, The Old Man and the Sea (1952), the story of an old fisherman's journey, his long and lonely struggle with a fish and the sea, and his victory in defeat.

Hemingway - himself a great sportsman - liked to portray soldiers, hunters, bullfighters - tough, at times primitive people whose courage and honesty are set against the brutal ways of modern society, and who in this confrontation lose hope and faith. His straightforward prose, his spare dialogue, and his predilection for understatement are particularly effective in his short stories, some of which are collected in Men Without Women (1927) and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories (1938). Hemingway died in Idaho in 1961.