Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

Version: Unabridged
Author: Daniel Goleman
Narrator: Daniel Goleman , Barrett Whitener
Genres: Self Development
Publisher: Macmillan Audio
Published In: October 2005
# of Units: 11 CDs
Length: 13 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Is IQ destiny? Not nearly as much as we think. This fascinating and persuasive program argues that our view of human intelligence is far too narrow, ignoring a crucial range of abilities that matter immensely in terms of how we do in life.
Drawing on groundbreaking brain and behavioral research, Daniel Goleman shows the factors at work when people of high IQ flounder and those of modest IQ do well. These factors add up to a different way of being smart -- one he terms "emotional intelligence." This includes self-awareness and impulse control, persistence, zeal and self-motivation, empathy and social deftness.
These are the qualities that mark people who excel in life, whose relationships flourish, who are stars in the workplace. Lack of emotional intelligence can sabotage the intellect and ruin careers. Perhaps the greatest toll is on children, for whom risks include depression, eating disorders, unwanted pregnancies, aggressiveness and crime.
But the news is hopeful. Emotional intelligence is not fixed at birth, and the author shows how its vital qualities can be nurtured and strengthened in all of us. And because the emotional lessons a child learns actually sculpt the brain's circuitry, he provides guidance as to how parents and schools can best use this window of opportunity in childhood. The message of this eye-opening program is one we must take to heart: the true "bell curve" for a democracy must measure emotional intelligence

Author Details

Author Details

Goleman, Daniel

Daniel Goleman consults internationally and lectures frequently to business audiences, professional groups and on college campuses. A psychologist who for many years reported on the brain and behavioral sciences for The New York Times, Dr. Goleman previously was a visiting faculty member at Harvard.

Dr. Goleman's 1995 book, Emotional Intelligence (Bantam Books) was on The New York Times bestseller list for a year and a half, with more than 5 million copies in print worldwide. It has been a best seller throughout the world and was translated into over 30 languages in more than 50 countries.

His 1998 book, Working With Emotional Intelligence (Bantam Books), argues that workplace competencies based on emotional intelligence play a far greater role in star performance than do intellect or technical skill, and that both individuals and companies will benefit from cultivating these capabilities. It became an immediate New York Times bestseller.

Dr. Goleman's Nov./Dec. 1998 article in the Harvard Business Review, ?What Makes A Leader?? received the highest reader ratings ever, becoming the best-selling reprint in the history of the HBR. His follow-up article in the March/April 2000 issue of the HBR, ?Leadership That Gets Results,? became another best-selling reprint.

His latest book, the March 2002 release Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence, unveils new scientific evidence demonstrating that a leader?s emotional intelligence has an enormous impact on the performance of groups being led and on an organization?s bottom line. Primal Leadership, co-written with Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee, was preceded by a related article by the three co-authors in the December 2001 issue of HBR entitled ?Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance.?

Dr. Goleman co-founded the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning at the Yale University Child Studies Center (now at the University of Illinois, Chicago), with the mission to help schools introduce emotional literacy courses. One mark of the Collaborative?s impact is that thousands of schools around the world have begun to implement such programs.

Dr. Goleman is co-chairman of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations, based in the School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University, which seeks to identify best practices for developing emotional competence.

He has received many journalistic awards for his writing, including two nominations for the Pulitzer Prize for his articles in the Times, and a Career Achievement award for journalism from the American Psychological Association. In recognition of his efforts to communicate the behavioral sciences to the public, he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Born in Stockton, California, Dr. Goleman attended Amherst College, where he was an Alfred P. Sloan Scholar and graduated magna cum laude. His graduate education was completed at Harvard, where he was a Ford Fellow, and he received his M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology and personality development. Dr. Goleman now lives in the Berkshires of Massachusetts with his wife Tara Bennett-Goleman, a psychotherapist. He has two grown sons, two grand-daughters and two nieces.